A new report from the United Kingdom claims that men are now more likely to get involved in domestic violence than before the COVID-19 pandemic. According to the researchers at the University of Sheffield, this could be because violence is often presented as a solution to a relationship problem in times of crisis.

With more people working from home and social distancing measures limiting face-to-face encounters, some men are turning to more dangerous coping mechanisms. While the overall number of violent acts committed is said to be down, the number of men committing severe violence is increasing.

An early indication of this trend can be seen in India, where the government is trying to tackle the issue of gender biases in its society. In the northern state of Haryana, there has been an increase in the number of reported domestic abuse cases, prompting officials to take action.

On February 28th, 2020, Haryana government officials in the state ordered the temporary closure of all retail shops, including clothing stores, beauty salons, and hair salons. They also asked citizens to stay at home and practice social distancing.

The state ordered the shutdown to curb the spread of COVID-19, and the move appears to have had an effect. The number of women seeking help in domestic abuse cases in Haryana fell by 78% between April 1st 2019 and March 31st 2020.

It’s a positive sign that more men are willing to speak up and seek help for domestic abuse, but the issue is still widespread. According to the United Nations, 216 million people worldwide were victims of physical or sexual violence in 2018, and three-quarters of the victims were women. That’s 1 in 100 people, or one in 40 men. It’s a global issue, and something that needs to be addressed worldwide.

The Link Between COVID-19 And Domestic Violence

While there is no direct scientific proof that COVID-19 causes domestic violence, there are a number of links between the pandemic and trends that increase the likelihood of domestic violence. Here’s a short list:

  • Limited social encounters and restricted access to public spaces makes criminals of isolation
  • Greater reliance on technology makes it easier for individuals to seek revenge online
  • Many abusers target their victims because they feel that society will not intervene
  • The sudden economic downturn makes it easier for some men to turn to abusive behaviors
  • During times of crisis, some people are more vulnerable to abuse than others
  • Shortages of various essential items make it easier for abusers to keep their partners under control
  • Fear of the unknown increases the desire to take control and protect oneself from harm
  • Limited access to healthcare encourages abusers to control their partners and keep them isolated

The link between COVID-19 and domestic violence is one that needs to be taken seriously. While there is no direct cause and effect, there are a number of ways in which the pandemic is making it easier for abusers to get away with their crimes. By understanding these linkages, we can protect people from domestic abuse more effectively.

The Rise In Violence Against Women

According to Dr. Tony Ward, a research fellow at the University of Sheffield, the recent rise in domestic violence could be attributed to several factors. First, the UK has a higher percentage of people who identify as Lesbian, Gay, or Bisexual than any other country in Europe. This is likely because of the government’s and society’s tolerance of sexual minorities, especially LGBT people. Second, one of the major effects of the pandemic is the increase in isolation – people are staying at home more and having fewer social encounters. This could make existing abusers feel like they have more freedom to behave badly, especially as there’s less social pressure to behave responsibly.

That could explain the findings from the United Kingdom. The number of men who physically abuse their partners jumped from 8.9% in 2018 to 12.2% in 2019. In 2020, it was 11.8%. These numbers are similar to what they were before the pandemic (15% in 2007, 16% in 2016). But the percentage of men committing severe violence (7.3% in 2020, 5% in 2019, 4.8% in 2018) is now increasing.

In India, 2018 was the second-highest reporting year for domestic abuse cases, with a total of 38,852 incidents. That’s up from 29,849 cases in 2017 and 27,963 cases in 2016. Between January and December 2019, an additional 35,000 incidences of domestic abuse were reported in the country. There are similar trends taking place across the world. One report from 2018 estimated that 62% of the world’s refugees had been subjected to violence in their home country. Another study from 2019 found that one in five women has been abused in Germany. Many people are turning to cyber-abuse as a way to keep controls over their intimate partners while avoiding close contact with these individuals. In a time of crisis, the urge to control those close to you and seek retribution is something that will not go away.

These numbers are concerning. Even more concerning is that, in many places, there is no clear legislation surrounding domestic abuse, which makes it difficult for survivors to come forward and access help.

Why It’s Important To Talk To Your Partner About Abuse

In many cases, abusive behavior is a two-way street. Women are also victims of domestic violence, and male abusers are usually considerably more aggressive and violent than their female counterparts. That’s why it’s so important to talk to your partner about the behavior patterns that make them feel unsafe. Even in a time of crisis, some people will not want to bring their problems to the surface and could even become enraged when you try and talk to them about it. Remember: your partner doesn’t want to talk about this either. So you might have to raise your voice a bit to get them to listen. But it’s important that you do.

Open and honest communication is the key to a successful marriage. It can help you understand what your partner is going through and allows you to work through problems together. One survey from 2019 found that, globally, 44% of respondents had not discussed their finances with their spouse or partner. Only 15% had regularly discussed these issues. Similarly, 14% of respondents had not discussed important family matters with their spouse or partner, while 16% had done so occasionally. The desire to keep life as normal as possible is leading some couples to keep their abusive behavior a secret. Only 12% of the respondents in the aforementioned survey had informed their partner about their plans to leave, while 7% had told someone else about it. But even among those respondents, 42% did not think their partner would actually try and stop them from leaving (41%). This demonstrates the extent to which people are keeping their abuse a secret from those closest to them. It also highlights the need for more open and honest communication in all areas of a relationship – financial, as well as emotional and physical.

How To Prevent Domestic Violence

While there is no one-size-fits-all solution to preventing domestic violence, there are a number of things that you can do. First, as we saw with the increase in physical violence, existing abusers are feeling more comfortable to act on their violent impulses. This can be prevented by reducing their sense of impunity. Second, men who are victims of domestic violence often feel that there is nowhere for them to turn for help. Establishing a safety plan with friends and family is the best way to ensure that you’re not isolated during times of crisis, and this could prove helpful in preventing future incidents. Third, it’s important to remember that not all men who are victims of domestic violence are bad guys. Many of them are just trying to avoid an abusive relationship and are fearful of what will happen if they do speak up. They may be seeking safety and support in counseling or community groups.

Categories: Blog