The development of female Viagra was a landmark in the pharmaceutical industry. Not only did it finally bring feminine health care into the mainstream, but it also sparked an entire new sub-category of erectile dysfunction (ED) – “blue pill” or “heart pill” ED. What is female Viagra? Read on to learn more.

A Medical Device For Women’s Health

When medication for ED was first approved in the 1980s, it was originally intended for use by men. However, as life expectancies increased and the disease became more prevalent among women, the need for medications in this area grew. Female Viagra is the culmination of years of research and development dedicated to creating a safe and effective treatment for women with sexual dysfunction.

The active ingredient in female Viagra is sildenafil (trade name: Viagra). Sildenafil is a potent inhibitor of human phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5), an enzyme that metabolizes cyclic guanosine mono-phosphate (cGMP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in blood vessels. The inhibition of PDE-5 prevents the breakdown of cGMP and ATP, both of which increase the amount of blood flowing through the vessels and thus the volume of blood in the penis, causing it to erect. The erectile response in women is greatly augmented by increased blood flow through the vaginal walls and the downstream effect on the clitoris and labia.

Why Is Female Viagra Different From Its Male Counterpart?

While all ED medications function in a similar manner, there are notable differences between female Viagra and its male counterpart, Viagra. For one, the dosage is often higher and more frequent for men with ED. Additionally, when men take Viagra, they typically experience an erection within 10 to 15 minutes, but with female Viagra, the effect usually occurs in half the time. Moreover, because sildenafil is highly selective for PDE-5, adverse reactions are much less common with female Viagra compared to other ED medications. There are also no documented reports of drug interactions with female Viagra.

Also, while all ED medications can be used to treat both sexes, the efficacy of these medications in women is still under investigation. However, numerous studies have proven that sildenafil significantly increases the likelihood of pregnancy in female rats, which raises safety concerns for its use during pregnancy. Further studies are needed in humans to confirm these findings, but until more information is available, using sildenafil during pregnancy is not advised.

What Forms Does Female Viagra Come In?

Female Viagra is available in various forms, including tablets, liquid, and oral spray. The spray is often less expensive than the tablets or liquids as a result of its easy-to-use, compact design. However, it should be noted that the spray does not contain sildenafil, but rather a similar yet equally effective drug known as tadalafil (trade name: Cialis).

Like other ED medications, female Viagra is taken by mouth or injection into the penis before sex. However, given its rapid onset and competitive price, it is often preferred that women use the oral formulation, particularly if they are just beginning their sexual workouts.

How Does Female Viagra Work?

Unlike most medications, which are quickly broken down and eliminated from the body, sildenafil continues to work in the body for up to 36 hours, making it a longer-lasting ED treatment option. Though the exact working mechanisms of sildenafil are not fully known, it is believed that the drug binds to PDE-5 in the corpus cavernosum of the penis. This binding inhibits the enzyme from breaking down cGMP and ATP, both of which increase the volume of blood flowing in the penis. As a consequence, the erectile response is greatly augmented, and thus the erection occurs. Additionally, as mentioned before, other medications may take longer to produce results but have much higher efficacy. To learn more, read this informative medical article about ED medications.

Because female Viagra is a PDE-5 inhibitor, it may be used along with other ED medications, such as alprostadil (Muse), to provide an additive or synergistic effect. However, as more research is conducted into female Viagra’s efficacy and safety, it is increasingly being used as a single medication to treat sexual dysfunction in women.

What Are The Side Effects Of Female Viagra?

As with any newly prescribed medication, there are a number of side effects associated with female Viagra, including nausea, headache, flushing, visual disturbances, and diarrhea. The incidence of these effects is similar to that of Viagra overall, and most are attributable to sildenafil. However, since female Viagra is a sub-category of ED medication, these side effects are generally less pronounced than with other ED medications. Further, as with any newly prescribed medication, patients should be monitored closely for signs of increased intracranial pressure, which may be caused by prolonged exposure to sildenafil. The most common side effect of sildenafil is headache, which affects nearly half of those taking the drug. Additionally, a similar proportion of patients report visual disturbances, primarily in the form of blurred vision or distortion.

Though most women experience relief from the side effects of sildenafil quickly, a small fraction of patients may require longer to recover. Therefore, it is recommended that patients begin using a stable dose for at least two weeks before any reduction or cessation of the medication.

How Long Does It Take For Female Viagra To Work?

It is not unusual for ED medications, including female Viagra, to take several weeks to produce the desired effects. However, in many cases, patients report immediate improvements in erectile function, sometimes even within the first day of treatment. For those individuals who experience this rapid onset of action, it is often attributed to a happy coincidence rather than any pharmacological effect. Nevertheless, given the unique property of sildenafil, it is not completely out of the question that this medication could produce remarkable results within a few days of administration.

What About Prescription Needle Exchange?

A common misconception is that doctors give out prescriptions for heroin and other opioids, which are highly addictive and dangerous drugs. However, these medications are primarily given to people with pain disorders and are often combined with antidepressants or other opiates for their analgesic properties. A common example of a pain medication that is frequently combined with an opiate is oxycodone (O.C.).

While oxycodone is a powerful analgesic and has a low abuse potential, it also has the ability to enhance the activity of opioid peptides, particularly enkephalin. In other words, when oxycodone is used in combination with an opioid, such as morphine or fentanyl, it can augment the effects of these medications, leading to potentially dangerous interactions. For this reason, doctors often avoid prescribing oxycodone unless it is necessary, which is why it is referred to as “reserve drug” in some parts of the country.

Oxycodone is one of the most commonly abused drugs in the United States. The dangers associated with oxycodone addiction are frequently cited in medical literature, and as a result, many doctors are uncomfortable giving out this medication. For this reason, many pain clinics have started demanding that patients show proof of opioid addiction before receiving treatment, which has made the treatment process more complicated for people struggling with this disease. In some cases, patients have been forced to try and deal with the addiction on their own, which is often a daunting task. However, in most situations, the best solution is to seek help from a doctor experienced in the diagnosis and treatment of addiction disorders. By taking the time to identify and treat the underlying cause of addiction, patients are much more likely to experience lasting recovery and be able to lead a normal life.

People who are prescribed opioid medications for pain typically require frequent blood tests to monitor the liver functions and make sure that the levels of these medications in the blood remain within a safe range. Even then, there is an increased risk of overdose when combining opioids with other medications, such as benzodiazepines or antidepressants. Further, as mentioned before, addiction is a chronic disease that requires long-term treatment, often including medication, psychotherapy, and behavioral therapy. Additionally, since erectile dysfunction is often a sign of underlying addiction, it is important that patients receive treatment for both conditions. This is why doctors often treat ED before any other symptoms of addiction appear, in order to identify and treat this disease as soon as possible. This combination of ED and addiction treatment reduces the risk of death for people with this syndrome. In some cases, this combination of therapy is far more effective than either treatment modality used individually.

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